Why Cast Aluminum Oil Pans

CAST ALLOY IS SUPERIOR

The Cast Advantage

Most racers are aware of the advantages a dry sump system offers over conventional oil systems. In terms of horsepower, reliability and space, even the simplest systems offer improvements over the best wet sumps.

At ARE we specialize in dry sumps. Thorough dyno testing and oil flow evaluation over the past 2 decades has allowed us to produce the most advanced oil sumps on the market.

In the beginning, we found that with even the best steel pans, there was as much as 3 quarts of oil in suspension throughout the engine. Further evaluation with clear bottomed pans confirmed our suspicion. The oil screens and scrapers were only doing half the job. Part of the problem was in design, and part, in the compromise of converting stock pans to dry sump pans.

The entire design needed a rethink. We believed the needed changes could only be accomplished with a casting, free of stock pan limitations.

 

The Right Stuff...

ARE dry sump systems have not been to outer space yet, nor is the space shuttle dry sumped. So, what is our point? Consider this analogy: If the Aerospace Industry were to design a dry sump pan, you can bet there would be no compromise in design, strength, durability and function. We approach the manufacturing of our products with the same prerequisite in mind.

First, we use the "Blank Sheet of Paper" design concept, uninhibited from stock sheet metal pan limitations, and therefore circumvent the inherent weakness of welded pans.

Second, we utilize aircraft alloy cast aluminum construction for it's inherent strength, vibration damping, and sealing abilities.

Third, we test and develop its efficiency both in house, and with the aid of top professionals.

Finally, we produce products which meet the ever increasing demands of top professionals. Our desire and commitment to offer the racer products designed in pace with current technology, is far more important than selling a high volume compromise. The fact that we prototype and produce more factory and private racing team backed dry sump products, reflects these commitments.

Please give us a call, or e-mail us, if you would like further information. We invite your questions.

We are proud to offer professional engine builders and racers our ever expanding and innovative line of dry sump products. Made in America by Americans for the world ...space later.

 

Technical Explanation
The Dry Sump System

The dry sump lubrication system is the ultimate oiling system for internal combustion engines. The simple fact that all Formula One, Indy cars, Le Mans and Sports Racing cars as well as Super Speedway Stock Cars use dry sumps, proves this point.

In order to have a good understanding of the dry sump system, let's first examine the wet sump system. Wet sump oiling systems are used on 99% of all street cars. They utilize a conventional oil pan with dipstick, where the oil is stored and supplied to the oil pump. The pans capacity can range from 3 quarts to 20 quarts or more, depending on the engine. The oil is sucked up a pickup tube into the stock oil pump, where it is filtered and supplied to the engine under pressure. While this system is very adequate for highway use, it presents problems under racing conditions. Aside from the size of the pan, and necessity of a deep sump, the oil is subjected to extreme cornering forces in racing, and the oil simply "crawls" up the sides of the pan and away from the pick-up. Although there are many good designs, with trap doors, etc., racing cars generate lateral and acceleration/deceleration forces that overcome the best wet sump designs. Aside from the obvious pressure loss, this also results in a reduction in horsepower as well as oil aeration.

These are the reasons dry sumps were developed. I will discuss other advantages later. The main purpose of the dry sump system is to contain all the stored oil in a separate tank, or reservoir. This reservoir is usually tall and round or narrow and specially designed with internal baffles, and an oil outlet (supply) at the very bottom for uninhibited oil supply. The dry sump oil pump is a minimum of 2 stages, with as many as 5 or 6. One stage is for pressure and is supplied the oil from the bottom of the reservoir, and along with an adjustable pressure regulator, supplies the oil under pressure through the filter and into the engine. The remaining stages "scavenge" the oil out of the dry sump pan and return the oil (and air) to the top of the tank or reservoir. If an oil cooler is used usually it is mounted inline between the scavenge outlets and the tank. The dry sump pump is usually driven by a Gilmer or HTD timing belt and pulleys, off the front of the crankshaft, at approximately one half crank speed.  The dry sump pump is designed with multiple stages, to insure that all the oil is scavenged from the pan. This also results in removing excess air from the crankcase, and is the reason they are called "dry sump" meaning the oil pan is essentially dry. Increased engine reliability from the consistent oil pressure provided by the dry sump system is the reason dry sumps were invented. The many other benefits I mentioned earlier are, shallower oil pan allowing engine to be lowered in chassis, horsepower increase due to less viscous drag (oil resistance due to sloshing into rotating assembly) and cooler oil.

We have also increased these advantages further through advanced designs of windage trays, and scavenge pickup designs and locations, as well as our utilization of precision machined alloy castings, which add stiffness to the block and afford better sealing. All in all, the dry sump system came out of necessity to maintain oil pressure, and evolved into a very sophisticated system which increases reliability as well as horsepower while allowing the engines to be mounted with the lowest center of gravity.

Gary Armstrong, S.A.E

Read an article on ARE Dry Sump Systems in the magazine Camaro Performers
Click Here

 Plumbing Schematics

External Pressure Pump
4 Stage

 

 

 4 stage are plumbing schematic

 

 

 

 


 

Special 1005 Stock Internal
Pump For Pressure

 

 

 1005 Stock Internal pressure are plumbing schematic for

 

 


 

SPINTRIC® Plumbing Schematic - Incorporating the Spintric

See Notes A through G (below)

 

Spintric AREplumbingSpintric

 

A - DrySump Pump scavenge outlet - Return to Tank - Applies to All Pumps
B - Inlet to Spintric® - Keep Line size the same (A) through (G)
C - Outlet from Spintric® - (De-aerated oil back to tank)
D - Install Oil Cooler Here (Optional)
E - Oil Inlet to Tank - Same as before, from Pump (A)
F - Air Relief from Spintrif to Tank Top
G - Air Relief recommend through deflector fitting PN 6312-SPD

 

LS 1-6 Install Instructions

We recommend using the Stock (or equivalent) pan gasket, with a light film of silicone for sealant. The stock bolts may also be used.

Dry Sump Pan #1005, #1005M


On Stage I systems, where the stock internal pump is still used for pressure, the special red fitting #6400, with special lip seals is used to form a suction tight seal between the pump and the oil pan, as the supply of oil from the bottom of the dry sump oil tank to the pressure pump.
NOTE: We make two versions of this design, STD and DRC, which is for “Dual Row Chain” usage. If you are using a Dual Row Chain, there are 3mm (.118) spacers, which move the stock pump forward. These pans are identified by “DRC” stamped on pan rail by front inlet. Only Oil Pans with “DRC” (special order) can be used with Dual Row Chain & Pump Spacers.

Windage Tray


We DO NOT recommend using the stock “factory” windage tray. The Aluminum tray & wiper, in you’re A.R.E. Dry Sump Pan is specially designed to work without the steel stock tray. Back-to-Back Dyno tests have shown as much as 8HP LOSS by using both trays.
NOTE: On “Ultra Shallow” #1009 version, the tray mounting extensions on the main cap bolts may also need to be ground off.
-The windage trays are secured to the pan with 10-32 stainless steel screws (1/8” allen) and special wave washers. We assemble the screws with motor oil only. We DO NOT recommend Loctite.
-The A.N. fittings in all ARE Oil Pans are “O” ring seal type. We recommend using motor oil and/or anti seize for sealant. Silicone sealant may also be used if necessary. “O” rings should be replaced occasionally, as needed.
-The scavenge fittings are fitted with stainless steel scavenge filters, integral in the fittings. These should be removed after 1st run, and periodically to check for debris. These also are a good indicator of bearing condition etc.

Plumbing


We recommend using –12 scavenge lines on Stage I systems. (#3120, 3 Stage scavenge use 1 –10 scavenge line from center pick-up in pan to front section of pump. Use –10 pressure lines to filter and back.) Important Scavenge lines should always be as short as possible. Also, avoid lines from forming a “toilet trap” effect by going up higher than the pump, then back down. Keep lines flowing upwardly to pump inlets. In Stage II & III systems using 3 scavenge stages, we use -10 scavenge lines and either –10 or –12 pressure inlet. Supply lines from tank bottom and scavenge return are always –12 (occasionally –16)

Initial Start Up


Prior to running engine for the 1st time, squirt some motor oil down the pump fittings to prime pump. Add 1-2 quarts to the engine itself, and fill the Dry Sump Tank at least ½ full. The supply line to the pressure pump should be loosened until a flow of oil is available at the pump. Check tightness of all lines.

Tank Level


Add oil until the oil level is just AT (NOT ABOVE) the level of the internal deaerater.

 

 

 

 

LS7STG3Inst2

 

 

 

 

 

LS7STG3Inst1

Checking Oil Levels in ARE Dry Sump Tanks

ARE currently sells 2 different types of Dry Sump Tanks.

First determine if you have our NEW Cast Top & Bottom/CNC tank (on your invoice the part number would have an “A” in it, 7007A, 7020A etc.)

The other type of tank we sell would be a “Fabricated” top and bottom tank and the part number would NOT have the letter “A” in it.

On both types of tanks, to check the oil, you must do so immediately after the engine is shut off. Do not check oil after engine has been sitting for a while as some of the oil will find its way back into the pan via gravity and you will get an incorrect tank level reading (this can happen in just a few minutes).

For the Cast Top/Bottom tank check oil immediately after engine is shut off by removing plug in center of the top of the tank and inserting the dipstick provided with the tank.

For the Fabricated tank, check oil immediately after engine is shut off by removing the cap and look at oil level through the cap/filler hole. The oil level should be at or just below the slotted or screened baffle at the upper portion of the tank.

These are pics of our new Cast CNC 7007A Dry Sump Oil Tank installed in a ZO6 Corvette. Note position of vent can and height so that the line from vent can slopes gradually to the top of the dry sump tank. This applies to all tanks. Otherwise there can be a "toilet trap" effect in the vent line, or simple filling of the vent can with oil mist accumulating in the line.

 

Checking oil levels 1

 

checking oil levels 2

 

checking oil levels 3

 

Technical Information / Consulting

GOT QUESTIONS ? NEED ADVICE?

From racers, car owners to engine builders, to those with NO knowledge about DRY SUMP SYSTEMS and racing engine fluid dynamics, you can now have the undivided attention of one of the few TRUE Dry Sump system experts in the world.

Gary Armstrong Phone Consulting AREGary Armstrong has a degree in Automotive and Mechanical Engineering, inventor of 5 US Patents on Dry Sump components as well as over 43 years owning and running ARE with enormous amounts of knowledge in racing engines. Designing and manufacturing Dry Sump Systems for engines of all types led to contracts and orders from General Motors, Nissan, Toyota, Honda HPD, Hennessey, GM Racing, Katech, Spyker, TRD, Swift, Deutz, Kubota, Cosworth, Ford, Mitsubishi, BMW and many more. We also are proud suppliers of our Dry Sump components to professional engine builders around the world such as, Katech, Mast Motorsports, Hendricks Motorsports, Zomer Racing Engines, TRD, Quicksilver, McLaren Engines, Goodwin Competition, Lingenfelter, Dallas Performance, and many more.

We are also distributors for most if not all of what could be thought of as "our competitors" other Dry Sump and related components. I am happy to include any non-ARE components in our conversation too. You will get an unbiased evaluation of your needs, and an actual quotation on our recommendations. No pressure, no return phone calls unless requested. Just solid and valuable advise. Same time explanations of technical data and drawings on the web sites, products and schematics.

My honest to God goal is to help you get the best and most out of your racing engine, starting with keeping your big investment and "rather important" race engine alive! You will get facts based on the science and physics of dry sump technology as well as years experience and testing, NOT something your neighbor read in a racing magazine, or some half right plan. The Dry Sump System is truly a "System" and every component must be designed and selected to be the right size / flow rate / volume etc to allow the system to work at its best and in concert. Included is also any information on the Spintric air / oil separator. Spintric Technologies, LLC is a division of ARE / Armstrong Race Engineering Inc.

Call or e-mail to make an appointment. Rates as follows:

15 minutes - $50.00

30 minutes - $80.00

1 hour - $150.00

Plus..... If you order an ARE system or over $2,000.00 worth of ARE products in the 6 months time following, we will deduct 50% of the consulting charge from your purchase. We are not doing this to make money, rather to allow questions to be answered for those needing help without cutting short our conversation due to work.

Thank you.

Sincerely,

Gary Armstrong and the team at ARE / Spintric

PUMP MOUNTING INSTRUCTIONS

READ CAREFULLY - PUMP MOUNTING AND DRIVE INSTRUCTIONS FOR INDIVIDUALLY MOUNTED PUMPS

Dry sump pumps are typically driven off the front of the crankshaft using either Gilmer or HTD round tooth belt drives. This positive drive type is needed on any pump except scavenge only pumps, which can e driven with serpentine belts because of the lighter load imposed. Any pump with a pressure stage incorporated should be driven with our "timing type" tooth belts.

The pump is normally driven at between 50 and 65% of crank speed. This is achieved by using a smaller gear on the crank and larger on the pump. The drive gear is mounted to our drive mandrel which bolts to all ATI dampers, or other crank pulleys can be machined to accept this drive also.

Unless you purchased one of our pre determined pump mounts to suit your engine, we will need to have the CENTER TO CENTER MEASUREMENT FROM CRANKSHAFT CENTER TO OIL PUMP SHAFT CENTER once you have mounted the pump to your block where you see fit, and clearance to suit your race car engine compartment. This can be done using our "universal pump mount" #3290. This pre drilled and tapped plate accepts all ARE side mount pumps, both 3 and 4 stage. The plate can then be drilled to mount to suitable bosses on your block, on whichever side of the engine you choose.

After this is done, the CENTER TO CENTER measurement dimension mentioned above will be used for us to give you the BEST COMBINATION OF DRIVE PULLEYS AND BELT for your engine and pump location.

ARE is happy to help you achieve this optimum pump drive combination by supplying us the above information after you have installed, or determined the exact location of your pump. NOTE: FINE TUNING OF BELT TENSION is achieved by installing SAE or precision flat washers in between the pump mount pedestals and the mount plate. An EQUAL amount of washers, of course, must be used under each pump pedestal.

BELT TENSION: The timing type drive belt, when all tightened down, should be "taught" not loose, but also not like a rubber band. There should be approximately 1/8" movement in up and down direction on the slack side of the belt. Some engine builders say the belt should be able to twist by hand, 90°. However, you choose to determine belt tension, keep in mind that at no time should be belt be allowed to "jump teeth." This will result in a worn out belt very quickly. While this drive method is virtually "bullet proof", a spare belt should always be carried with you.

Gary Armstrong Copyright © 2013

LS7 Z06 ARE LS7-LS9 Retro Fit

Installation Instructions
Dry Sump System (Stage lll Shown)
ARE Stage 3 Plumbing
For Stage  System Eliminate #3, 16, 17 & 8

 ls7 ls9retroinstall 2

 

“PATENTED”     MADE IN USA

 

 

 

Connections/Oil Lines as Numbered

1-14     Low Pressure Tank to Catch Can

6-2       -12AN (No. 044) Scavenge Return line from forward side of
sump pan (6) to tank upper inlet (2)

16-3     -12AN (No. 043) Scavenge line from outlet of new scavenge pump (16) to #2 tank inlet (3)

4 & 5   Low pressure (rubber) to Air Bridge (but may decide not to use depending on emissions.  Also Spintric® air inlet to tank.

15-7     -12AN (No. 042) Supply line from bottom of oil tank (15) to rearward inlet (7) on sump pan.  (Supplies Pressure Pump)

8-17     -12AN (No. 045) Sump pan scavenge outlet (8) to new scavenge pump inlet (17). Note: This line may change in the future to -16AN

9-12     -10AN (No. 046) line from sump outlet (9) to remote filter inlet (12)

13        Plugged. Alternative inlet depending on location of filter

18        Plugged or use as an auxiliary outlet for mechanical oil pressure gauge

NOTE: REMOVE FACTORY WINDAGE TRAY BEFORE INSTALLING ARE DRY SUMP PAN

NOTE: LINE NUMBERS ABOVE REFER TO KATECH PRE-MADE LINES AVAILABLE DIRECTLY FROM KATECH- CONTACT JASON@ (586) 791-4120

Above directions are for oil cooler installed in pressure side of system.  This is the preferred way to cool the  LS-7 System providing the factory pressure pump maintains adequate oil pressure. Loss of pressure can sometimes occur due to extra distance & flows of oil through cooler.  The oil cooler may also be installed in scavenge return lines to tank.  ie: 7-2 or 16-3 (stage III)

First oil Filling

The System will hold between 9 and 12 quarts (existing holds 8 quarts)

1.   Do NOT add oil to the tank at time of installation of the pan (as oil will flow into the pan)

2.   Through the red cap on the oil tank, pour say 8 quarts of oil, Add 2 quarts to Engine

3.   Crank the engine (plugs removed) to build up oil pressure

4.   Replace the plugs

5.   Start the engine and allow to warm to operating temperature

6.   Oil Pressure should stabilize around 50 PSI or more

7.   After checking pressure, leaks etc, turn off engine and immediately open the red cap and check the oil level

8.   Add oil until the oil level is just AT (NOT ABOVE) the level of the internal deaerater. (Slots)

NOTE: It is very important that when checking tank oil level (#8 above) that the engine has been run above idle, and shut off when level in tank checked not more than 5 minutes after shutting engine off #7, #8 above.

 

Dry Sump Instructions

Drive Systems

Dry Sump oil pumps, whether scavenge only pumps, or 3-5 stage pumps with pressure stage, are generally driven off the crankshaft, either by special ATI Dampers built for ARE with pump drives incorporated or with drive mandrel/Pulley assemblies bolted to front of c/s Damper/Pulley.
NOTE: From index on www.DrySump.com Home Page- Go to "Drives" and "Drive Gallery" for photos and information, located in index on left.

Scavenge Only Systems

Our Scavenge only systems as used on Chevrolet LS series Engines- ARE Stage 1 systems, are typically driven with serpentine belt drives, using our 8005 or 8007 (Y or F) body dampers, and 3020YM or 3020FM pump mount/tensioner assemblies.
NOTE: These systems use the stock internal pump to supply pressure

Stage II & III Pumps w/pressure stage

On our Stage II, III or IV systems we always use a HTD (High Torque Drive) Round tooth metric, or Gilmer (Square tooth) drive assembly.

Generally we design the drive system to run the pump at between 50-65% of crankshaft speed.

ARE LS Series Dry Sump Systems

The ARE "Direct to Block" mounting system is specially designed to allow both Y body corvette and F body systems to be driven with out HTD/ATI drive assembly. the belt tension is pre-determined and only needs to be adjusted slightly as block variations dictate, by using 2 precision flat washers between pump mount bracket, and black/ARE triangular plate. The belt should be "Taught" but never tight. Conversely- belt should not have too much slack. the slack side of belt should be able to twist approx. 45 DEG from flat.

This same type belt tensioning system is used to "fine tune" belt tension on our side mount pumps only with 4 washers or equal thickness under each pump mount "Leg."

Checking Oil Level in Tank

On ARE Dry Sump Tanks- oil level in operation should be at or just below slotted or screened baffle at upper portion of tank. after running remove cap and look at oil level through cap/filler hole. (See instructions on LS7 Install Instructions #7-8 Click Here)
NOTE: Make sure engine is run prior to checking as oil can find it's way back to pan via gravity, giving a wrong tank level reading. (within minutes)

Adjusting Pressure on Dry Sump Pumps

On our 3, 4 stage, and up DrySump Pumps WITH a pressure stage ( NOT scavenge only) pressure can be adjusted. On the rear, BOTTOM ( INLET SIDE) of the pump there is a hex nut and threaded adjusting screw pointing up ( vertically ) Loosen the hex nut, and with an allen wrench, screw the adjuster IN ( CLOCKWISE) to increase Pressure, and COUNTER CLOCKWISE to back it off ( reduce pressure) . Every engine / Pump is slightly different, but usually one turn will increase or decrease pressure by 20-30 PSI Then tighten the nut back up.

Draining the oil in a Dry Sump System

To change oil in a Dry Sump System, the oil should first be still warm from running. Dry sumps differ from standard wet sump systems in that the majority of the engines oil is stored in the Dry Sump tank. However, there will still be oil in the pan, lines and filter.

1) ARE dry sump oil tanks have a threaded "O" ring plug in the very bottom of the tank, under the cone shaped bottom. Remove this plug to drain the majority of the oil. If you can not get to the bottom drain plug, the oil can be ( mostly) drained by un screwing the line hose end that is connected to the oil supply fitting on rear bottom of the dry sump pump pressure stage. (ARE pumps) or in the case of scavenge only systems, from the fitting in the pan that supplies the internal oil pump. This line can then be allowed to hang down below the tank bottom and drain. Most of the oil will be syphoned out, as although the fitting is on the lower side of the tank, ARE tanks have an internal tube going to the bottom.

2) ARE dry sumps have integral screen filters built into the scavenge fittings in the pan, which help protect the scavenge stages on the dry sump pump from any large particles in the oil. These should be removed to check the screens for debris. At the same time, this will allow the oil that remains in the engine and pan to drain.

3) The rest of the lines and oil cooler can be drained the same way.

4) The spin on oil filter will also be changed at this time, and lines drained if needed. . The new oil filter should be filled with your new oil before installing. This allows the engine to get pressurized oil sooner, without having to fill the filter too.

Keep in mind that if this is a normal maintenance or "after every race" oil change, and there is no debris in the oil, or reason to think there might be, you do not have to drain all the lines unless you want to. The tank, pan, filter and cooler should evacuate the majority of the oil, and if relatively clean will merge fine with the new oil.

Note: this is totally a matter of choice and not a recommendation

After the oil change, follow the normal "tank filling and oil level" instructions.

Draining the oil in a Dry Sump System

To change oil in a Dry Sump System, the oil should first be still warm from running. Dry sumps differ from standard wet sump systems in that the majority of the engines oil is stored in the Dry Sump tank. However, there will still be oil in the pan, lines and filter.

1) ARE dry sump oil tanks have a threaded "O" ring plug in the very bottom of the tank, under the cone shaped bottom. Remove this plug to drain the majority of the oil. If you can not get to the bottom drain plug, the oil can be ( mostly) drained by un screwing the line hose end that is connected to the oil supply fitting on rear bottom of the dry sump pump pressure stage. (ARE pumps) or in the case of scavenge only systems, from the fitting in the pan that supplies the internal oil pump. This line can then be allowed to hang down below the tank bottom and drain. Most of the oil will be syphoned out, as although the fitting is on the lower side of the tank, ARE tanks have an internal tube going to the bottom.

2) ARE dry sumps have integral screen filters built into the scavenge fittings in the pan, which help protect the scavenge stages on the dry sump pump from any large particles in the oil. These should be removed to check the screens for debris. At the same time, this will allow the oil that remains in the engine and pan to drain.

3) The rest of the lines and oil cooler can be drained the same way.

4) The spin on oil filter will also be changed at this time, and lines drained if needed. . The new oil filter should be filled with your new oil before installing. This allows the engine to get pressurized oil sooner, without having to fill the filter too.

Keep in mind that if this is a normal maintenance or "after every race" oil change, and there is no debris in the oil, or reason to think there might be, you do not have to drain all the lines unless you want to. The tank, pan, filter and cooler should evacuate the majority of the oil, and if relatively clean will merge fine with the new oil.

Note: this is totally a matter of choice and not a recommendation

After the oil change, follow the normal "tank filling and oil level" instructions

2016 ARE Media Spintric by ARE

Tanks ARE Media 2015 ARE Media

Contact

Gary Armstrong: info[at]drysump.com

Shop: +1 (916) 652-5282

Fax: +1 (916) 652-6041

 

Business Hours

  • Monday-Thursday: 9am to 5pm (Pacific Standard Time)
  • Friday: By Appointment
  • Saturday & Sunday: Closed

 

Phone Consulting by Appointment

consulting

Dry Sump Systems One-On-One Phone Consulting:
Sit down and get the undivided attention of President and CEO of ARE Dry Sump Systems Inc and Spintric Technlogies LLC, Gary Armstrong.

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